4 Characters From Hindi Cinema That We All Love

There are some films that stay with us for a long long time. They become eternal in our hearts, and what makes them eternal could be the story or music, but more often than not, its the characters of the film. There are so many brilliant characters penned down in the history of films who have multiple layers to them, back stories and overall depth that add to their screen presence. Through #CharacterCanvas, we bring to you a bunch of really interesting characters – we delve into their lives and paint them into our interpretation by adding some artistic element around them on our canvas.

1. Rumi from Manmarziyaan (2018)

Manmarziyaan has got three really interesting characters, every character has their own persona which is very evident throughout the film’s narrative. But the one character’s development who we couldn’t resist adoring was Rumi’s. Rumi is one of the most flawed characters that we have seen in recent times, yet she manages to charm a lot of us. In fact, it’s Taapsee Pannu’s favorite character too.

The first impression of Vicky’s is that of an irresponsible douchebag but we can’t deny the fact that Rumi is equally flawed, if not more. She can’t seem to be decisive about her relationship, lashes out at her customers over which hockey stick is better, bashes the pani-puri vendor for not making them as spicy as she likes them, and humiliates Vicky over his complexes.

Basically, at many points, she is unreasonably annoying and irritating, but then what makes her so adorable? Probably, the relatability factor. As humans, we too have our own share of flaws – we screw up things and we are unreasonable at many points in our lives. We see a hazy mirror in Rumi’s character.

Rumi and Vicky are known for their “Grey Wala Shade”, but if we were to paint a color around Rumi on our canvas, it would be close to her shade of cool hairdo – Red. Red is universally used for appetite or hunger which clearly goes with her thirst for regular ‘Fyaar’, the color also defines her bold, boisterous, and full of energy attitude. Actually, she is so full of energy that it creates tension which bursts out in the form of jogging rigorously in some scenes throughout the film. And lastly, everyone knows how hot-headed she is, we could not think of a better color than red to justify Rumi’s rage.

2. Kabir Khan from Chak De! India (2007)

“Mujhe states ke naam na sunai dete hai, na dikhai dete hai. Sirf ek Mulk ka naam sunai deta hai – India”This line really sets up who Kabir Khan is and what does he stand for. Khan’s backstory of being an alleged traitor is probably the heaviest load on his heart because he’s never played hockey for any other motive than making his country proud. He makes it very clear in one of his speeches “Is Team ko sirf wo players chahiye jo pehle India ke liye khele, fir apni team me apne saathiyo ke liye, aur uske baad bhi agar thodi boht jaan bach jaaye, toh apne liye”

Khan’s character arc has been well written, the younger self is shown for a very little screen time but he’s shown as a fierce passionate bloke who will probably give it back to you aggressively. This was evident in his tiff with the media after they call him a sellout. But with time, he has evolved as a person and become calmer as the team’s coach – he uses sarcasm and a smile to send across the message clear.

Looking at him, it reminds us of the famous expression “Ice & Fire”. Khan is the right combination of both – he has the balance of passion and composure, he can send a chill down the spine of a player by firing them if they’re wrong but at the same time is also compassionate about their situations and dreams.

But if there has to be an element that could define kabir khan it would be the ‘Tricolour’. It is the biggest motivation for him in life, to make his country excel in the sport. That’s why the first exercise he does with the women’s team is to paint them in one mentality i.e to play for the country, to play for the tricolour.

3. Rani Mehra from Queen (2013)

This coming of age tale of Rani Mehra is awe-inspiring in many ways. Her character arc has been designed in a way that you see her grow by leaps and bounds but it is still relatable and believable because of the way she overcomes her vulnerabilities.

There are very little details shown in the film that define her beautiful journey of discovering the true Rani in herself – like the initial scenes in Paris when she struggles to carry her hefty bag wherever she goes but towards the end she is confidently shown carrying her rucksack symbolising how she no longer needs anyone to lift her up. Interestingly, she is never shown going out anywhere without her little brother but for her to take the intuitive decision to go alone on her own dream honeymoon speaks about her hidden strong character.

It’s known how travelling can help shape a person’s thoughts, and we are so thankful to Rani for taking this wonderful trip which helped her discover what she’s capable of and breakout from a lot of wrong notions about herself and the world. It was because of this trip that she could do some crazy things like her first kiss with an Italian guy, making new friends from different cultures, drunk dancing to Bollywood songs and much more.

The pink colour on the canvas is to capture the naivety and intuitiveness that spills out of the character, but the main reason behind painting her in the hues of pink is “Hope”. Pink is the colour of hope, and surely this character gives just that to many women in this world who deserve to be the ‘queen’ in their own right.

4. Piku from Piku (2015)

Piku was a celebration of true feminism, representing a large section of women who find no place in Indian cinema – women who don’t fit either of the standard female characters in Bollywood – ‘descended-from-heaven perfect’ or ‘rebel-without-a-cause sassy’

As the film opens to the scene of morning chaos in Banerjee household, you sit in both awe and amusement of Piku’s quintessential behaviour. She handles everything impeccably but not without her acidic anger in high decibel.

As she watches Rana leave, she’s vulnerable, sensitive and full of love, but she can never let anyone see that. It’s her little secret, reserved only for those who deserve it. She would keep reiterating, “Don’t think ki main impressed hoon”

She’s beautiful, but that’s the least of her concerns. When she bursts out in anger as Baba goes missing, that’s the real beauty of her character. She’s human, and doesn’t try to be any other way. She’s flawed, but she owns up to it.

And just when you think you know her completely, she amazes you again. When Baba passes away, she’s heartbroken, but not angry, not devastated. She was content knowing that he died peacefully.There’s perhaps no other colour as multi-faceted as purple, like Piku herself. She’s intense, yet calm. Full of courage with an underlying vulnerability. Its the color of grace, but doesn’t scream for attention; subdued, like Piku. It stands for power and gravitas, but not without a hint of love – like the closeted romantic that Piku is. But more than anything, it embodies the mysterious charm. Unpredictable, always.

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